Navigate/Search

Archive for December, 2006

How to Use the Polar OwnCal Feature in Your Weight Loss Program

Friday, December 1st, 2006

In Polar heart rate monitors with the OwnCal Feature, exercise duration can be determined by using your desired calorie expenditure as your goal. Daily and weekly exercise goals can conveniently and easily be set in terms of calories burned. Because the heart rate monitor tracks both the energy/kcal expenditure in one exercise session and the accumulated kilocalories of several sessions, during, for example, a week or a month, it helps in achieving the energy expenditure goals.  For more information on using Polar heart rate monitors for healthy weight loss, click here.

Factors affecting exercise energy expenditure
The amount of energy expended during exercise depends on exercise intensity and duration. The higher the intensity and the longer the duration, the greater the energy expenditure. Energy expenditure is also dependent on body weight, so that a heavier person consumes more energy than a lighter one when performing the same exercise because the mass that the person needs to move is greater. For example, persons weighing 130 pounds and 260 pounds expend 5 kilocalories and 8 kilocalories per minute in brisk walking, respectively. Also, the larger the muscle mass used in the exercise the greater the energy expended. Thus, very high energy expenditures can be reached in exercise that involves cross-country skiing and rowing, for example. Types of exercise where the person must support his/her body weight typically expend more calories than types where the exercise equipment supports the weight.

Physical activity for weight loss purposes
For weight loss purposes the recommended energy expenditure can be set to 300 kcal/ session. Conducted on most days of the week this will result in a calorie expenditure of 2000 kcal/week on a 155 pounds person, approximately the kilocalorie content of 2 pounds of fat in a month.

Comparison between the distribution of energy sources in jogging and walking

Comparison between the distribution of energy sources in jogging and walking

Polar Heart Rate Monitor Troubleshooting Checklist

Friday, December 1st, 2006

Before you return your Polar Heart Rate Monitor to Polar for service, please check the following:

1. Is the transmitter belt worn correctly? The belt should be flat against the skin, with the Polar logo right side up.
2. Are the electrodes on the transmitter moist?
3. Is the transmitter clean?
4. Is the receiver within one metre range from the transmitter?
5. Are the heart rate signals very high and abnormal? Relocating the receiver may help. Check the list of sources of disturbances in this document.
6. Check that there are no other transmitters within one metre if you have a non-coded transmitter.
7. Has the battery been changed by an unauthorised party, causing damage to the receiver?
8. Have the buttons been pressed under water, causing leakage in the receiver?
9. If the receiver display is frozen, carry out global reset, if your model has that feature (see the manual for global reset instructions).
10. The chemicals in some swimming pools and seawater may effect the ECG signal pick up.
11. The ECG signal strength varies depending on the individual’s tissue composition. The percentage of people who have problems in heart rate measuring is higher in water environment than in normal use.